Bud Bilanich http://www.budbilanich.com Your Career Mentor Thu, 17 Jul 2014 14:47:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.1 A Reminder: Crack the Leadership Code: Lead with Confidence, Inspire Performance and Make a Difference Begins on Monday July 21 http://www.budbilanich.com/a-reminder-crack-the-leadership-code-lead-with-confidence-inspire-performance-and-make-a-difference-begins-on-monday-july-21/ http://www.budbilanich.com/a-reminder-crack-the-leadership-code-lead-with-confidence-inspire-performance-and-make-a-difference-begins-on-monday-july-21/#respond Thu, 17 Jul 2014 14:47:28 +0000 http://www.budbilanich.com/?p=6474

Crack the Leadership Code: Lead with Confidence, Inspire Performance and Make a Difference

Hosted by Dr. Michelle Pizer

The 21-day event begins on July 21st, and it is FREE!

Click here to reserve your seat! <www.cracktheleadershipcode.com>

We hear all the time about the suffering of employees, but what about the silent suffering of leaders? The truth is, leadership can be lonely and we need a place to reflect and learn.

That’s why I’m speaking at Dr. Michelle Pizer’s special summit, along with 20 other leadership experts. Dr. Michelle Pizer is an executive coach and organizational psychologist bringing credibility and compelling strategies to the idea that great leaders arent born – theyre bred.

Great leadership is a mindset. It’s not just about getting the job done; it’s about how you get it done. It’s about humanizing the workplace.

Over the course of the 21 days of the summit, learn essential skills from conversational intelligence to finding your charisma and cultivating talent in today’s changing business environment.

No matter where you are in the hierarchy, you can turn your silent suffering into productive and dynamic leadership – and your employees will thank you for it. That’s good news for the workplace – and good news for the bottom line.

Crack the secret code of leadership.

Register now. <www.cracktheleadershipcode.com>

 

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Courage and Personal Responsibility http://www.budbilanich.com/courage-and-personal-responsibility/ http://www.budbilanich.com/courage-and-personal-responsibility/#respond Tue, 15 Jul 2014 13:17:18 +0000 http://www.budbilanich.com/?p=6515

You know that as your career mentor, I’m always on the lookout for solid life and career success advice. I have some more for you today. It comes from my friend Eric Harvey.

Eric is the CEO of Walk the Talk Company and the author of several great leadership, life and career success books. His book, The 10 Commandments of Leadership, coauthored with Steve Ventura, is terrific.

Eric and Steve believe that courage is an essential characteristic of all leaders. I agree, and go one step further. Courage is an essential characteristic for creating your life and career success. According to Eric and Steve, courage can be defined as…

  • Following your conscience instead of following the crowd.
  • Taking action again hurtful or disrespectful behaviors.
  • Sacrificing personal gain for the benefit of others.
  • Taking complete responsibility for your actions…and your mistakes.
  • Following the rules – and insisting that others do the same.
  • Challenging the status quo in search of better ways.
  • Facing setbacks and disappointments head on — without losing your drive and spirit or adopting a victim mentality.

Pretty good list. How many of these statements are true about you?

I really like Eric and Steve’s last point. Tweet 32 in my career advice book, Success Tweets says, “Stuff happens as you go about creating your life and career success. Choose to respond positively to the negative stuff that happens.” In other words, face setbacks and disappointments head on. Don’t lose your drive and spirit. Don’t become a victim.

Here’s how I see it, and it’s simple common sense. Career success is all up to you, and me, and anyone else who wants it. We all have to take personal responsibility for our own life and career success. I am the only one who can make me a career success. You are the only one who can make you a career success.

Stuff happens as you go through life: good stuff, bad stuff, frustrating stuff, unexpected stuff. Successful people respond to the stuff that happens in a positive way. Humans are the only animals with free will. That means we – you and me – get to decide how we react to every situation that comes up. That’s why taking personal responsibility for yourself and choosing to respond positively to the negative stuff that happens to you is so important.

Personal responsibility means recognizing that you are responsible for your life and career success and the choices you make. It means realizing that while other people and events have an impact on your life and career success, these people and events don’t shape your life and career success. When you accept personal responsibility for your life and career success, you own up to the fact that how you react to people and events is what’s important. And you can choose how to react to every person you meet and everything that happens to you.

The career mentor point here is simple common sense. Successful people know that they can choose how they respond to everyone they meet and everything that happens to them. They know that “the devil made me do it” is never an accurate statement. They also know that no one can “make” them mad. In short, they follow the career advice in Tweet 32 in Success Tweets. “Stuff happens as you go about creating your life and career success.” Choose to respond positively to the negative stuff that happens.” If you want to create the career success you deserve, choose to react positively to the negative people you meet, and the negative things that happen to you. When you do, you’ll find that you’ll have less negative things happening and fewer negative people entering your life.

That’s the career advice I find in Eric Harvey and Steve Ventura’s thoughts on courage. What do you think? Please take a minute to share your thoughts with us in a comment. As always, thanks for reading my musings on life and career success. I value you and I appreciate you.

Your career mentor,

Bud

PS: If you haven’t already done so, you can download free copies of Success Tweets and Success Tweets Explained. The first is a tweets book, the second is a whopping 390 + pages of career advice explaining each of the common sense tweets in Success Tweets in detail. Go to http://www.successtweets.com to claim your free copy. You’ll also start receiving my daily life and career success quotes, and you’ll get a free membership in my career mentor site, My Career Mentor.

 

 

 

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The Importance of Being Likable http://www.budbilanich.com/the-importance-of-being-likable/ http://www.budbilanich.com/the-importance-of-being-likable/#respond Mon, 14 Jul 2014 12:36:28 +0000 http://www.budbilanich.com/?p=6511

Besides being your career mentor, I’m on the editorial board of a print magazine called PM 360.  It’s devoted to brand managers in the pharmaceuticals and medical device industries.  Here’s a recent article I wrote for them…

A couple of years ago, Ben Affleck won the Academy Award for Best Picture for his movie, Argo. Ben is known as a likable guy, so when he turned from acting and took up directing, people were willing to help him. That’s how Argo got made.

About the time the movie came out, an article in Time magazine discussed the importance of likability in the film industry:

“The film industry, like most other businesses, is a small group of people who all know one another and everyone tries to work with the likable person. Likable people’s bosses let them do the things they don’t let other people do. When likable people stumble, others help them. Likable people call this kindness. Unlikable people call it office politics.”

This is great career advice—likability is important. Tweet 137 in my career success book, Success Tweets, offers advice on likeability. It says, “Do your job; give credit to others for doing theirs. Everyone likes to work with people who share the credit for a job well done.”

Seven tips for becoming likable at work are the starting point for effective work relationships. Follow them and you’ll become a likable person, a better brand manager—and you’ll climb the corporate ladder faster.

1. Suggest solutions to the problems you identify. Identifying problems is easy. Likable people provide thoughtful solutions to the problems and challenges they raise, which earns respect and admiration from everyone around them.

2. Don’t ever play the blame game. When you publicly blame others, you create enemies who will help you fail. Likable people create allies by taking their share of the blame when things go wrong.

3. Respect the people around you. Talking down to others, using sarcasm or taking a nasty tone disrespects other people. It’s never appropriate to engage in this type of behavior.

4. Never blindside people. Likable people keep their colleagues in the loop and discuss problems with them first. They don’t ambush others.

5. Always keep your commitments and deadline. When you don’t, it negatively affects the work of other people. If you can’t keep a commitment, make sure the affected people know as soon as you can. Give them a new due date and then honor the new deadline.

6. Share credit for accomplishments, ideas and contributions. It’s very rare that you can accomplish anything with no help from others. Likable people thank and recognize the people who help them succeed.

7. Help people find their greatness by assisting them to harness their best abilities and you will become known as a likeable person. Compliment, recognize, praise and notice contributions.

If you follow these seven tips—especially number six—you will become a likable person. You’ll develop effective work relationships. Colleagues and bosses will value you. You’ll accomplish your work goals, have some fun, get recognized as a team player and move up quicker.

Your career mentor,

Bud

 

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#1 Secret For An Interview-Snatching Phone Screening http://www.budbilanich.com/1-secret-for-an-interview-snatching-phone-screening/ http://www.budbilanich.com/1-secret-for-an-interview-snatching-phone-screening/#respond Thu, 10 Jul 2014 15:24:58 +0000 http://www.budbilanich.com/?p=6507

Phone screening interviews can be difficult and stressful. Often they come out of nowhere, but you better be ready to step up and get the job done. In this case, getting the job done means getting yourself invited to an in person interview with the company.

Speaking of phone screening interviews coming out of nowhere, many years ago I had a phone screening interview in the nude. I was a student at Harvard and had answered an ad in the New York Times for an internal consulting position with a very large company. One day I had just stepped out of the shower and was toweling off. The phone rang. I answered it.

The hiring manager for the job was on the line. He asked if I had some time to chat with him. I said “sure.” I sat down in my favorite chair and put the towel over my lap. We spoke for about 90 minutes – I was naked the entire time. At the end of the call, the hiring manager invited me to New York to meet a few other people. I got invited back the day before Thanksgiving and received an offer. I started work on January 2.

I never would have landed this job had it not been for my ability to switch into interview mode quickly upon receiving the call. I was able to do that for one reason: preparation. Even though I was naked and right out of the shower, I was prepared for the interview.

After I sent my resume to New York, I spent some time thinking about what they were looking for and how my skills and experience matched up. I thought about what I had accomplished and learned along the way.

I used what I call the START method to prepare answers to questions I might receive and also to highlight certain points that I wanted to make sure I made in an interview. You might be familiar with the START method for answering interview questions. START stands for Situation or Task, Activity, Result and Takeaway. I prepared a START answer for every criteria they had for the job. I also prepared a START answer for important points I wanted to emphasize.

Here’s an example. They were looking for someone who had great team building skills. I had done a lot of team building in previous jobs, so I created a START answer that went something like this…

“Just before I left my last job so I could return to school I conducted a team building program for the VPs of Sales and Marketing at my company. They both invited five of their most senior leaders. Sales were down, and the VPs wanted to do some brainstorming to figure out what they could do to meet their annual sales target (the Situation and Task). I began the meeting by exploring reasons for the poor sales performance. We listed several potential reasons. One stood out. This was a consumer products business that relied on promotions throughout the year to hit their sales numbers. Sales were down because promotional products weren’t available on time. The Marketing department had taken ads in the local papers advertising the promotions, the Sales department had sold in the products. However, sales were lost because the product weren’t available as advertised. We brainstormed several reasons for this problem. Finally, I asked the team to do a flow chart of the product promotion process. Long story short, we found that they were allowing 26 weeks lead time for each promotion. As it turned out they needed at least 28 weeks lead time to make sure the products were available as advertised. In other words, they were two weeks behind when they started, and that assumed that everything went perfect (the Activity). I suggested that they change the cycle to 30 weeks. They did, and the problem went away (the Result). I learned that sometimes really complicated problems can have a simple solutions. Now, when I work with teams, I always encourage them to look for the simplest solution possible (the Takeaway).”

 I had about 10 of these START answers prepared. I got to use only five or six of them, but it was enough to get me invited to New York for an in person interview. And that’s all you want from a phone interview – to get invited to an in person interview.

 To sum up, you can ace a phone screening interview by being prepared – even if you’re naked during the interview. Prepare by learning everything you can about the job and company. Then prepare more START answers than you think you’re going to need. Practice these answers out loud. If you do this, you’ll be ready when that phone call comes.

 You might be thinking this is a lot to do, especially if you don’t even know you’re going to get an interview. It is. Many people just won’t take the time to do it. But doing this type of preparation will almost guarantee your success when it comes to phone screening interviews. The extra effort will pay off. It’s only common sense.

Your career mentor,

Bud

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Write Your Way to the Top http://www.budbilanich.com/write-your-way-to-the-top/ http://www.budbilanich.com/write-your-way-to-the-top/#respond Wed, 09 Jul 2014 13:36:38 +0000 http://www.budbilanich.com/?p=6489

One of the things that I’ve learned as a career mentor is that good writing will set you apart and put you on the road to the life and career success you want and deserve.  Most unsuccessful people are poor writers.  They are unclear.  They ramble.  Their emails, letters and reports are a series of long sentences filled with big words that don’t really say anything.

You can’t catch people’s attention by writing this way.  You need to write in a clear, crisp, concise manner.

I do my best to write like a journalist.  I use short sentences with a simple subject-verb-object structure.  My writing may read a little staccato-like, but it communicates.  People tell me that they can understand my points and the reasoning behind them.  And that’s what I want when I write.

Your objective in writing at work is to communicate – not to impress others with your vocabulary.  Several years ago I was speaking with my niece at her college graduation party.  We were discussing y book Straight Talk for Success.  I said that I’d tried for an “avuncular hip” writing style.  She said, “What does that mean?”  I replied, “Avuncular means uncle-like.  I wanted to sound like a hip uncle to people reading the book.”  She came back with a great question: “Why didn’t you just say so?”

She was right.  Everybody knows what “uncle-like” means.  A lot of people, including magna cum laude graduates like my niece, don’t know the word “avuncular.”  I was just showing off my vocabulary by using that word.  As a result, I didn’t communicate effectively.  This was bad enough in conversation.  It’s even worse in writing when the other person can’t ask you that question immediately.

Write with your reader in mind.  Sometimes it’s a good idea to read aloud what you’ve written to get a feel for how it will sound to your reader.  Write in short, simple sentences.  Use the simplest words you can to get across your point, while still being accurate.  Write fast.  Get your thoughts on paper or the computer screen as quickly as you can.  Then edit and rewrite until you’ve said exactly what you want to say.  One of my first bosses always told me that rewriting is the secret to good writing.

Spelling counts, too.  Correct spelling does two things for you.  First, it shows that you have a good command of the language.  Second, and more important, correct spelling demonstrates that you respect both yourself and the reader.  Misspelled words stand out like sore thumbs to readers.

I learned this lesson again about a month ago. I posted a piece on LinkedIn. In the very first sentence, I made a horrible spelling error. I used the word “new” when I intended to use “knew.” I got several negative comments about this error. Several people even said that they stopped reading the post as soon as they saw that error.

Don’t just spell check your documents.  Proof them.  Spellcheck often won’t pick up improper usage in words like “your” and “you’re,” “hear” and “here,” “their” and “there,” and “new” and “knew.”

The same holds true for punctuation.  Make sure that you know how to properly use periods, question marks, commas, colons, semicolons, exclamation marks, quotation marks and apostrophes.  If you’re not sure about punctuation rules, spend a little time on the Internet learning proper usage.

Become a clear, concise and crisp writer and your career will take off.  It takes a little work, but will be worth it in the long run.

Your career mentor,

Bud

PS: If you haven’t already done so, you can download free copies of two of my career success books, Success Tweets and Success Tweets Explained. The first is a tweets book, the second is a whopping 390 + pages of career advice explaining each of the common sense tweets in Success Tweets in detail. Go to http://www.successtweets.com to claim your free copy. You’ll also start receiving my daily life and career success quotes.

 

 

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It’s Nice to be Important, It’s More Important to be Nice http://www.budbilanich.com/its-nice-to-be-important-its-more-important-to-be-nice/ http://www.budbilanich.com/its-nice-to-be-important-its-more-important-to-be-nice/#respond Tue, 08 Jul 2014 13:09:09 +0000 http://www.budbilanich.com/?p=6487

A couple of years ago, Lydia Ramsey and I have published a career advice book: Success Tweets for Creating Positive Personal Impact.   It’s about business etiquette. You can get a copy at http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_0_10?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=success+tweets+for+creating+positive+personal+impact&sprefix=Success+tw.

Tweet 4 says, “Be courteous. It costs you nothing and can mean everything to someone else. It also helps in getting what you want.”

A while back my flight from Denver to Newark was delayed by about an hour. Instead of returning to the club, I chose to stay at the gate and do some people watching. I got to observe some courteous behavior and some very discourteous behavior.

First the courteous behavior — the gate area was crowded. Three travelers came up. All were over 60, one was in a wheel chair. The attendant pushing the wheelchair was able to find only one seat. He parked the wheelchair near it. One of the wheelchair bound person’s traveling companions had a place to sit, the other did not. A young man immediately got up and offered his seat to the other traveling companion. He was following the advice in Tweet 4.

On the other hand, there was a 30ish couple who had staked out an area on the floor near the boarding area. They had several bags that were spread over a fairly large area. They had two iPads that they were charging and they were eating. People could not easily get by them to get to the podium to check in.   The woman realized they were causing a bit of a traffic jam, and mentioned it to the man. His response, was “Screw them, we were here first” – not exactly courteous.

Because of the delay, several people kept returning to the podium to ask questions of the agents. One guy stood there patiently waiting. Two people cut in front of him and approached the podium. Finally, he said to the third person, “There’s a line here.” The guy’s response – “I have to ask her (the agent) a question,” and he just pushed on by. This guy was in his 50’s and was dressed nicely. He looked to be a successful business person – someone who should have mastered basic courtesy by this point in his life.

Air travel is stressful enough these days – crazy TSA rules, overcrowded flights, delays. Simple courtesy, such as displayed by the young man who offered his seat to people traveling with a wheelchair bound person, mitigates some of that stress. Rude behavior adds to it.

Here are some of my thoughts on basic courtesy…

  • Open doors for others (regardless of gender or status). Courteous people open doors for others and hold the door, until everyone in their party has walked through. They also hold the door behind them if someone else is approaching.
  • Allow people to exit elevators prior to entering. If you are near the buttons, press and hold the “door open” button until everyone in the elevator has made their exit.
  • Always stand to greet visitors. This shows that you respect them as individuals. Shake hands, and offer your visitor a seat before you sit down yourself.
  • Assist your visitors with their coats. Offer to hang it for them. If you don’t have a place to hang a coat in your office, place it neatly over the back of a chair.
  • Introduce the person of lower business rank to the person of higher business rank.

Business meals are another place where you can demonstrate that you are a courteous person who understands the rules of business etiquette. Here are some of my thoughts on business meal courtesy…

  • Wait until everyone has been seated before unfolding your napkin and placing it in your lap at a business meal.
  • Your water glass is on your right and your bread and butter plate is on your left. If someone uses your bread and butter plate, don’t correct him or her, just place your bread on your dinner plate.
  • If you leave the table during a meal, place your napkin on your chair. Once you have finished eating, place your napkin neatly, but not folded, on the table.
  • Wait until everyone has been served before beginning to eat.
  • Do not put your purse or briefcase on the table.
  • Avoid using your cell phone during business meals.
  • The host should be the one to bring up business. If you are the host, it is usually best to wait until everyone’s order has been taken before beginning a business discussion
  • The most senior person in the group should pay for business meals – unless that person has delegated that responsibility.

Business etiquette is important. Basic courtesy is not old fashioned, it’s smart business. These are just a few common sense tips on business etiquette. If you follow them, you will find that people respond positively to you – that you’re making a positive personal impact. And making a positive personal impact is an important part of career and life success.

The career mentor point here is simple common sense. Successful people create positive personal impact. Basic courtesy is the foundation of all positive personal impact. Follow the advice in Tweet 4 in Success Tweets for Creating Positive Personal Impact. “Be courteous. It costs you nothing and can mean everything to someone else. It also helps in getting what you want.” It’s true, courtesy can mean a lot to others – like the people traveling with the wheelchair bound person. It also marks you as someone who pays attention to others – not just yourself. Courtesy helps you create positive personal impact, and positive personal impact helps you get people on your side. People who are on your side are more willing to help you create the life and career success you want and deserve.

That’s my career advice on being courteous. What do you think? Please take a minute to share your thoughts with us in a comment. As always, thanks for reading my musings on life and career success. I value you and I appreciate you.

Your career mentor,

Bud

PS: If you haven’t already done so, you can download free copies of two of my career success books, Success Tweets and Success Tweets Explained. The first is a tweets book, the second is a whopping 390 + pages of career advice explaining each of the common sense tweets in Success Tweets in detail. Go to http://www.successtweets.com to claim your free copy. You’ll also start receiving my daily life and career success quotes.

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20 Words for a Successful Life http://www.budbilanich.com/20-words-for-a-successful-life/ http://www.budbilanich.com/20-words-for-a-successful-life/#respond Mon, 07 Jul 2014 13:59:28 +0000 http://www.budbilanich.com/?p=6478

As your career mentor, I’m always looking for helping life and career success information.

Tony Jeary is known as The Results Guy. I am a subscriber to his ‘newsletter. Yesterday he sent out a post entitled “The 20 Most Powerful Words for a Successful Life.” I like what Tony has to say, so I am reposting his thoughts here.

The 20 Most Powerful Words for a Successful Life

Tony Jeary

  1. Values: Know what matters most to you.
  2. Happiness: Take time to understand what truly makes you happy. Then build a life around it. As I like to say, “it makes every day feel like a weekend.”
  3. Curiosity: Be learning every day, all the time. Huge wins come from a life of insatiable curiosity.
  4. Thinking: Instead of doing so much, do what matters. The only way to get there is to think more than most do.
  5. Leverage: Multiply your efforts, your resources and your time by being smart.
  6. Clarity: Know what you want and why you want it. And not just what you want to have, but also experience, share, give and, of course, become. Then gain the “Pulling Power” of clarity to attract it.
  7. Focus: Constantly eliminate distractions. Do those things that lead to what matters most. Document and review your High Leverage Activities (HLAs) constantly.
  8. Execution: You have to take action; don’t procrastinate. Incorporate “Production Before Perfection.”
  9. Share: Don’t tell; rather, share. No one hates sharing, and most actually welcome it. Sharing leads to much of life’s joy.
  10. Assess: Evaluate and measure everything that matters. Find the gaps and zero in. Assess the best and benchmark/model against it.
  11. Objectives: Always know the goal, and how it fits into the vision, the mission and the priorities.
  12. Engagement: Be entertaining, involving and insure people win. Life will be full of wonderful surprises.
  13. Presenting: Nothing happens until something is communicated, to yourself, your team, the world.
  14. Health: Constantly delete all types of toxins from your body and your mind. It allows you to rest, live with less stress and be at peak performance in everything you do.
  15. Systems: Automate everything you can. Strive for “maintenance-free” in everything. Freedom comes from aligned systems that work. With more freedom comes so many more choices.
  16. Preparedness: Where is the hockey puck going to be, and what do you need to do before it gets there? Preparedness breeds confidence, brand and character.
  17. Team: An often overlooked piece of life’s puzzle is the awesome power of a “Life Team.”
  18. Appreciation: People are influenced, endeared and inspired when they are genuinely appreciated; do it often.
  19. Smile: It’s self-explanatory.
  20. Results: Perhaps my favorite word, because everything either leads to it, or not.

Which of Tony’s words really caught your attention? Clarity, execution and Results are my top 3.

I hope you found these words to be helpful to you in your life and career success journey.

Your career mentor,

Bud

 

 

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How to Deal With Negative People http://www.budbilanich.com/6482/ http://www.budbilanich.com/6482/#respond Thu, 03 Jul 2014 14:22:34 +0000 http://www.budbilanich.com/?p=6482

As your career mentor, I’m always looking for good ideas on life and career success. A while back I came across an interesting article that contained some great career advice from Lori Radun called “7 Ways to Deal With the Negative People in Your Life.” As you know, I’m a big believer in surrounding yourself with positive people. Positive people help build your self-confidence and help you on your journey to life and career success.

I also think that negative people can really hold you back on your career success journey. In fact, Tweet 50 in my career advice book Success Tweets says, “Jettison the negative people in your life. They are energy black holes. They will suck you dry; but only if you let them.”

I realize that this is easier said than done. Sometimes the negative people we encounter are in our family, sometimes they are coworkers. We all have deal with negative people on occasion. That’s why I like Lori’s article. Here are her seven bits of career advice on dealing with negative people.

  1. Let the negativity pass. No one is in a negative mood 100% of the time. Don’t argue with people when they’re in a negative mindset.
  2. Give positive – not negative – attention to negative people. Often their negativity is nothing more than a cry for attention.
  3. Focus on the positive. Look for the positive in the situation. It can be difficult to find, but there is something positive in almost any situation.
  4. Ask negative people to elaborate. Often, negative people speak in absolutes – “always” or “never.” Asking for specific examples can help you take some of the negativity out of the situation.
  5. Don’t try to change the negative person. Let him or her vent. You don’t have to agree with what he or she says, but you can tone down the negativity by just listening.
  6. Avoid negative people if you can. As I’ve mentioned above, sometimes you have to interact with negative people. However, do your best to minimize your contact with them.
  7. Keep your own negative thoughts and behaviors in check. You can choose your attitude. Choose to be positive. Be grateful for the positive things in your life and you’ll be better equipped to deal with negativity when it pops up.

I like all seven of Lori’s points, but I particularly like Point 2, Give positive – not negative attention to negative people. Tweet 105 in Success Tweets says, “Conversation tips: be warm pleasant, gracious and sensitive to the interpersonal needs and anxieties of others.” This is doubly true when it comes to dealing with negative people. They need kindness and support too. Sometimes your kindness may be just what they need to deal with their negativity.

Tweet 106 in Success Tweets says, “Demonstrate your understanding of others’ points of view. Listen well and ask questions if you don’t understand.” This is another way of providing positive attention to negative people. How do you show provide positive attention to a negative person? Lori Radun says “You must listen to what he or she is trying to tell you.” Great point. Engaging, listening, and asking questions shows a negative person that you are paying attention. Often, that is all the positive attention they need.

The career mentor point here is simple common sense. We all have to deal with negative people on occasion. When it comes to dealing with negative people, successful people follow the career advice in Tweet 105 in Success Tweets. “Conversation tips: be warm, pleasant, gracious and sensitive to the interpersonal needs and anxieties of others.” Inviting negative people to participate in a conversation in which you really listen to what they have to say is an important, but often overlooked conversation skill. When you invite a negative people to join a conversation about what is bugging them, you give them positive attention and help them deal with their negativity. If you want to become adept at dealing with negative people, follow all seven of Lori Radun’s points but focus on point 2 — give them positive – not negative attention. Engage negative people in conversation. Your relationships with them will improve, and you might help them deal with some of their negativity. This simple common sense career advice can make your life a lot more pleasant.

That’s what I think about dealing with negative people. What do you think?   Please take a minute to share your thoughts with us in a comment. As always, thanks for reading my musings on life and career success.

Your career mentor,

Bud

PS: If you haven’t already done so, you can download free copies of Success Tweets and Success Tweets Explained. The first is a tweets book and the second it a whopping 390 + pages of common sense career advice explaining each of the tweets in Success Tweets in detail. Go to http://www.successtweets.com to claim your free copies.

 

 

 

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Optimism and the Fourth of July http://www.budbilanich.com/optimism-and-the-fourth-of-july/ http://www.budbilanich.com/optimism-and-the-fourth-of-july/#respond Wed, 02 Jul 2014 14:11:12 +0000 http://www.budbilanich.com/?p=6480

We’re coming up on the Fourth of July; Independence Day in the USA. If you read this career mentor blog with any regularity, you know that I’m a big believer in the power of optimism. The Fourth of July always makes me reflect on those folks who signed the Declaration of Independence way back in 1776. As a group, they had to be among the most optimistic people ever.

I think it optimism is the foundation of all self-confidence – an important key to creating the life and career success you want and deserve. You can’t be self-confident if you’re not optimistic. And optimism is a choice. I get up every day believing that good things will happen – and then I go about making them happen. I follow the career advice in Tweet 42 in my career mentor book Success Tweets. “Choose optimism. It builds your confidence. Believe that today will be better than yesterday, and that tomorrow will be better yet.”

When I was a kid, I participated in the local Optimist International chapter’s oratory contest. I won my section, and finished third in the state. The topic that year was “Optimism, Youth’s Greatest Asset.” That’s hard enough for a ninth grader to say (think Joe Pesci in “My Cousin Vinnie”), let alone write and deliver a ten-minute talk.

Optimist International is a great service organization. They help kids build self-confidence and become more optimistic. The Optimist Creed defines them. It’s powerful stuff. Take a look…

The Optimist Creed

Promise Yourself:

  • To be so strong that nothing can disturb your peace of mind.
  • To talk health, happiness and prosperity to every person you meet.
  • To make all your friends feel that there is something in them.
  • To look at the sunny side of everything and make your optimism come true.
  • To think only of the best, to work only for the best, and to expect only the best.
  • To be just as enthusiastic about the success of others as you are about your own.
  • To forget the mistakes of the past and press on to the greater achievements of the future.
  • To wear a cheerful countenance at all times and give every living creature you meet a smile.
  • To give so much time to the improvement of yourself that you have no time to criticize others.
  • To be too large for worry, too noble for anger, too strong for fear, and too happy to permit the presence of trouble.

I love The Optimist Creed. I have it framed and hanging in my office, just above my desk. I have made a .pdf of The Optimist Creed that is suitable for framing. I’m making a gift of it to you this Independence Day. If you want a copy, just go to http://budbilanich.com/optimist.

One thing that you’ll notice about The Optimist Creed is that it is proactive. It asks you to promise yourself to do ten things that will help you create the life and career success that you want and deserve. It suggests that optimism is related to action – action you can take to become more optimistic and to build your career success. I think it is some of the best career advice I’ve come across. I do my best to live the 10 points in The Optimist Creed every day. You should too.

I especially like the fourth point – “promise yourself to look at the sunny side of everything and make your optimism come true.” This point goes directly to the idea of committing to taking personal responsibility for your life and career success. I know it’s difficult to look at the sunny side of things when you’re mired in a problem or are dealing with a failure. However, if you look for what you can learn from problems and failures, you’ll be looking at the sunny side. More important, you’ll be on your way to making your optimism come true.

Christopher Reeve is no longer with us, but he exemplified the idea of looking at the sunny side of things. Even though he was paralyzed from the neck down after a riding accident, he devoted himself to finding a cure for spinal cord injuries. I love the way his optimism comes across in this quote…

“So many of our dreams at first seem impossible, then they seem improbable, and then, when we summon the will, they soon become inevitable.”

Christopher Reeve looked at the sunny side of his injury and did what he could to make his optimism come true. His foundation carries on the work he started.

The career mentor point here is simple common sense. Successful people are self-confident. Self-confident people are optimists. They follow the career advice in Tweet 42 in Success Tweets.Choose optimism. It builds your confidence. Believe that today will be better than yesterday, and that tomorrow will be better yet.” The Optimist Creed is a great guide to becoming more optimistic and self-confident. Its proactive approach to life is a great guide to creating the life and career success you want and deserve. Remember the old saying, “Whether you’re an optimist, or a pessimist you’ll be proven right.” Just like that group of men in Philadelphia on July 4, 1776 I choose optimism, and hope you do too.

That’s my career advice on the power of optimism this Fourth of July. If you’re in the USA, I hope you’ll enjoying the holiday. Be safe if you’re playing with fireworks. Please let us know what you think about today’s career advice by leaving a comment. Thanks for reading as always. I really appreciate you for reading my musings on life and career success.

Your career mentor,

Bud

PS: If you haven’t already done so, you can download free copies of Success Tweets and Success Tweets Explained. The first is a book of tweets the second is a whopping 390 + pages of career advice explaining each of the common sense tweets in Success Tweets in detail. Go to http://www.successtweets.com to claim your free copies. You’ll also start receiving my daily life and career success quotes.

 

 

 

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Crack the Leadership Code: Lead with Confidence, Inspire Performance and Make a Difference http://www.budbilanich.com/crack-the-leadership-code-lead-with-confidence-inspire-performance-and-make-a-difference/ http://www.budbilanich.com/crack-the-leadership-code-lead-with-confidence-inspire-performance-and-make-a-difference/#respond Mon, 30 Jun 2014 12:40:08 +0000 http://www.budbilanich.com/?p=6471

Crack the Leadership Code: Lead with Confidence, Inspire Performance and Make a Difference
Hosted by Dr. Michelle Pizer

The 21-day event begins on July 21st, and it is FREE!

Click here to reserve your seat!

We hear all the time about the suffering of employees, but what about the silent suffering of leaders? The truth is, leadership can be lonely – and we need a place to reflect and learn.

That’s why I’m speaking at Dr. Michelle Pizer’s special summit, along with 20 other leadership experts. Dr. Michelle Pizer is an executive coach and organizational psychologist bringing credibility and compelling strategies to the idea that great leaders aren’t born – they’re bred.

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Over the course of the 21 days of the summit, learn essential skills from conversational intelligence to finding your charisma and cultivating talent in today’s changing business environment.

No matter where you are in the hierarchy, you can turn your silent suffering into productive and dynamic leadership – and your employees will thank you for it. That’s good news for the workplace – and good news for the bottom line.

Crack the secret code of leadership.  Click here to register.

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