Bud Bilanich http://www.budbilanich.com Your Career Mentor Tue, 28 Apr 2015 12:50:13 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.4 Indifference is the Enemy of Your Success http://www.budbilanich.com/indifference-is-the-enemy-of-your-success/ http://www.budbilanich.com/indifference-is-the-enemy-of-your-success/#respond Tue, 28 Apr 2015 12:50:13 +0000 http://www.budbilanich.com/?p=7681

The other day I had some Chinese takeout. My fortune cookie had a very interesting message…

“A different world cannot be built by indifferent people.”

That’s true, whether you’re talking about politics, social change or your career success. If you want to create something different, something better, you have to be willing to put in the time and effort necessary to make that change a reality.

Dictionary.com defines indifferent this way… “Without interest or concern; not caring; apathetic.” It’s simple. If you don’t care enough about your career success to put in the time and effort necessary to succeed, you never will.

Kind of reminds me of the John Mayer song, “Waiting on the World to Change.” Check it out…

“It’s hard to beat the system

When we’re standing at a distance.

So we keep waiting,

Waiting on the world to change.

That’s why we’re waiting,

Waiting on the world to change.

We keep on waiting,

Waiting on the world to change.”

If you want to create the life and career success you want and deserve, you can’t stand a distance.  You can’t wait for things to change.  You have to get up close and personal.  You have to do the things that will bring you the success you want.

I bet you read Samuel Beckett’s play “Waiting for Godot” when you were in high school. If you slept through class that day here’s a brief summary. The play has two main characters, Vladimir and Estragon. They spend the entire play waiting for the arrival of Godot. He/she/it never shows up. The big question that our English teacher posed was “Who or what is Godot?” For our purposes here, we don’t have to worry about that.

But here’s something we do need to think about. Waiting will not get you far. Whether you’re waiting on the world to change or waiting for Godot, if you don’t get up and do something, take some action, you’ll never move your life and career forward. All of which brings me back to the fortune cookie. Waiting is a form of indifference. Don’t be indifferent. Do something. Take action. Action is the key to success.

Your career mentor,

Bud

PS: I write this blog to help people create the life and career success they want and deserve.  Now I’m going one step further.  I’ve created a membership site in which I’ve pulled together my best thoughts on success.  And, as a reader of this blog, you can become a member for free.  Just go to  www.BudBilanich.com/join to claim your free membership. You’ll be joining a vibrant and growing community of success minded professionals.  I hope to see you there.

 

 

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Preparation is Good — Procrastination is Not http://www.budbilanich.com/preparation-is-good-procrastination-is-not/ http://www.budbilanich.com/preparation-is-good-procrastination-is-not/#respond Mon, 27 Apr 2015 12:56:11 +0000 http://www.budbilanich.com/?p=7679

There is nothing sadder than unfulfilled potential. That’s why I work so hard these days even as most of my contemporaries are starting to slow down.  As I look back at my life I realize that I could have accomplished a lot more than I have.  And I haven’t done poorly.

That’s why this article caught my attention.

https://leadershipfreak.wordpress.com/2015/04/25/7-ways-to-rescue-lost-potential/

The question at the end of the article, “How might too much preparation block success?” is interesting.

I’m a big believer in the power of preparation.  In fact, one of my earliest mentors told me that “preparation makes up for a lack of talent.”  This advice has served me well over the years.  I’m usually the best prepared guy in the room.

On the other hand, procrastination is a problem.  I think that this is what Dan Rockwell, the author of the article, is trying to get at.  We can deceive ourselves into thinking that we are preparing when in fact we are procrastinating.  I often tell my clients that “procrastination is the physical manifestation of fear.”  We procrastinate, sometimes in the name of preparation, because we are afraid of the consequences of taking action.  We might fail.  We might get rejected.  Our efforts might not be good enough.

Some salespeople don’t make the calls they need to succeed.  They procrastinate by telling themselves they need to learn more about their product offering or their potential customer before they can go on a successful call.  Some task forces seem to drag on forever and ever,  Their members procrastinate by telling themselves that they need one or tow more pieces of information before they can come up with the best recommendation.  Some students are habitually late with their assignments.  They procrastinate by telling themselves that they need more time to do the research necessary to write the perfect paper.

In my experience these salespeople, task force members and students are procrastinating because they are afraid that their work won’t be good enough — that they’ll be judged harshly. The article talks about facing up to your discomfort and doing something.  In this case, you can think of discomfort as fear.

Successful people look their discomfort and fear in the eye and act.  They prepare properly — but not overly so.  Then they move forward.  The make the sales call.  They give the recommendation.  They submit the paper.

That’s what you need to do if you’re going to succeed in your life and career.  Push past discomfort.  Face your fears and act.  You’ll be on your way to reaching your potential and a successful and fulfilling life and career.

Your career mentor,

Bud

PS: I write this blog to help people create the life and career success they want and deserve.  Now I’m going one step further.  I’ve created a membership site in which I’ve pulled together my best thoughts on success.  And, as a reader of this blog, you can become a member for free.  Just go to  www.BudBilanich.com/join to claim your free membership. You’ll be joining a vibrant and growing community of success minded professionals.  I hope to see you there.

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If you’re thinking about changing careers, you will find this article helpful. It lays out five roadblocks that you are likely to encounter — and what to do about them.

http://www.mscareergirl.com/2015/04/24/5-roadblocks-for-career-changers-to-overcome/

Changing careers can be challenging, but if you put the advice in this article to work you’ll do fine.

Your career mentor,

Bud

PS: I write this blog to help people create the life and career success they want and deserve.  Now I’m going one step further.  I’ve created a membership site in which I’ve pulled together my best thoughts on success.  And, as a reader of this blog, you can become a member for free.  Just go to  www.BudBilanich.com/join to claim your free membership. You’ll be joining a vibrant and growing community of success minded professionals.  I hope to see you there.

]]> http://www.budbilanich.com/7676/feed/ 0 Keeping It Clean: Social Media and Getting a Job http://www.budbilanich.com/social-media-and-getting-a-job/ http://www.budbilanich.com/social-media-and-getting-a-job/#respond Wed, 22 Apr 2015 12:00:27 +0000 http://www.budbilanich.com/?p=7673

Once it hits the Internet, it will always be there! You hear it all the time from teachers and employers about just how dangerous social media can be when trying to apply and get hired for a job in your respective career.

We all have had those moments in college that we’re not too proud about and about 95 percent time your friends know about those moments because of social media. It’s where we post videos, photos and details of our personal lives for everyone to see including those we might not want to see like perspective employers.

A 2012 survey by Jobvite found that 92 percent of recruiters for mainstream companies in America used social media as a part of their recruiting process. Many companies even require their perspective applicants to have a strong online presence to promote the company they’re applying for.

Many people ask why is my social media profile so important for getting a job in a career that I have expertise in? For employers it doesn’t matter about experience, it matters about any risks that could potential hurt their company. They want employees who mesh well with their other employees, someone who’s kind and courteous, who doesn’t have a temper or engage in any practices that could prove unethical to company standards. It’s surprising to most that an employer can tell all of this by simply looking at your Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, or Instagram profile.

How do they do this? What do they look for? What tells them that you might not be a good employee for their company?

What Hurts Your Chances and Why

Photos and Videos

According to most social media strategists, photos can tell a lot about who someone is in all aspects of their lives. If many of your photos are of you out drinking at a bar or at a club through the early hours of the morning, many employers might see this as irresponsible, immature and unstable. All three are crucial in maintaining a job for most employers.

Are your pictures or videos of questionable behavior that could be labeled as illegal? According to one national survey, pictures and videos of a perspective job applicant smoking marijuana or them being in a room where others are doing it, is the quickest way to be taken out of contingency for a job position.

Using profanity or vulgar hand gestures gives employers a since of your attitude about life in general. They’re less likely to consider you for a position if many of your photos or videos show you using your middle finger or dropping the ‘F’ bomb regularly.

Rants and Raves

We all know that one person who goes on their rants about specific topics in their lives. This includes talking about their love life, finances, jobs, and friendships.

A number of employers have turned down offering jobs to perspective employees because they’ve actually went on rants about how much they hated their last career and who they worked for. For employers it shows immaturity to be able to work in a professional environment and work with those you might not always agree with or get along with.

Friends Lists

This section of our social media profiles doesn’t hold as much weight as pictures or our tweets/statuses but it gives an employer a chance to see whom you associate yourself with.

A persons group of friends shows an employer how diverse you are and if you could work in a culturally diverse environment in their company.

Info Section

If this section is filled with information irrelevant to promoting yourself, it could potentially you. Usually this section is one that many people only allow those who aren’t friends to see so it’s really the first and only impression of who you are aside of your profile picture.

Many times Facebook users will label their job as “getting money day and night” for their occupation section or “the school of hard knocks” for their education section. If you’re a 25-year-old college graduate, employers expect to see a since of professionalism when it comes to promoting your image on social media. Doing things like these shows the lack of professionalism, putting you below other applicants in the job pool.

Fixing Your Social Image

It goes far beyond just choosing a new profile or cover photo for your Twitter or Facebook. Pay full attention to your entire profile and leave no section unturned because chances are your perspective employer will be searching every inch of your social media presence in addition to background screening.

Privacy Settings

They’re different for each social media platform but all work the same way, to limit what people see. Privacy settings have so many features whether it be hiding certain posts from those on your friend’s lists or completely blocking someone from seeing your profile at all.

On Twitter and Instagram, making your feed private allows people who follow you to see what you post. You’re also in control of accepting follower or friend requests for these pages so you can limit who sees your posts.

In Facebook situations, you can even make your profile untraceable so perspective employers or family members would even be able to find you when they type in your name.

If you feel the need to keep the same material on your social media profiles as you start your job search, make sure you’re protecting your profile and keeping it out of reach from job employers.

However, other more professional profile pages like your LinkedIn should be searchable and visible for employers. These types of profiles can serve as an expanded resume showing business connections, organizations you belong to and even reviews your fellow co-workers and former employers give you.

Cleaning Up Your Act

There’s a point in our lives where we all realize that we need to grow up and start acting like adults. When that moment happens on social media, you’ll know it’s now time to do some spring-cleaning of your multiple profiles.

Deleting pictures and videos can be difficult because they’re memories we’ve made with friends, family and co-workers but if it detracts from your overall image, it’s time to hit the delete button. You can always save these images to your phone or computer so you don’t have to lose out on memories built in the past.

Leave no stone uncovered on your social media profiles! Sometimes we forget we posted a picture, video, note, status, or comment because it happen a while ago but it’s your job to clean up 100 percent of your profile.

The deeper you dig, the more you can uncover and the more you can clean up!

Google Yourself!

No, we’re not talking about being conceited but it really is a great way to see what material you have on the Internet that you’ve published from your multiple social media platforms. Many people forget they have a Tumblr page or Vine profile with material they’ve posted but when searching Google, material on these profiles may be uncovered.

Don’t Slip, Stay Professional

This may be the hardest part for teenagers and young adults, even harder than doing the cleaning on their social media profiles. Once you’ve done your extensive cleaning, now it’s time to keep it clean. You don’t want to regress back to your old posting habits once you get your dream job because your employer could still be watching!

Ask yourself before you post on Facebook or Instagram, will this hurt my chances of getting a job in the future or ruin the relationship I have with my current employer? If the answer is yes, it’s best to keep the thoughts or posts in your head and off of the Internet because once it’s there, chances are it will always be there!

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No Two Ways About It — You Have To Do the Work If You Want To Succeed http://www.budbilanich.com/7668/ http://www.budbilanich.com/7668/#respond Tue, 21 Apr 2015 12:45:53 +0000 http://www.budbilanich.com/?p=7668

Sunday morning I had an email from a life coach in my inbox.  She told the story of her daughter who is in 11th grade and taking a combined trigonometry and calculus course.  It seems that her daughter came to her and told her that she need to “manifest” a B on an upcoming test.  She suggested a simple technique.  She told her daughter to smile — and she imagined her daughter smiling after the exam.

Here’s part of the email…

I imagined my girl smiling saying, “All this math stuff worked out.” Truly if you think about it, we have about 7 weeks left of the school year (I know… can you BELIEVE IT?), so no matter what, it will work out. :) I want to encourage you to try this. Think of something that has you worried or afraid or anxious or overwhelmed  then just imagine yourself smiling and FEELING like it all worked out. You do not have to figure out the HOW. Just the image of you smiling will shift your energy, and your point of attraction! This is super easy and super powerful. Use it on anything. Try it, and be sure to share your success with us.

I read this and thought, “The Law of Attraction strikes again.”  I’m glad the young woman got a B on her exam.  On the other hand, I find it hard to believe that she and her mother manifested the grade by imagining themselves smiling when she received the results of the exam.  If only life were that simple.

Either this kid was really lucky, or she did what she needed to do to get her B — she studied and got some tutoring to prepare for the exam.

I know some people will disagree with me, but you don’t manifest anything.  You earn it by hard work.  It helps to go into an exam feeling confident about your chances of success.  But it helps a whole lot more to go into the exam having done the necessary preparation and work.

If you read this blog with any regularity, you know that I am a big believer in the power or optimism.  I have The Optimist Creed on a plaque just above my desk.  The fourth point of The Optimist Creed says…

“Promise yourself to look at the sunny side of everything and make your optimism come true.”

There are two things at work here — looking at the sunny side, or imagining your smile when you succeed, and doing the work necessary to make your optimism come true.  I think it’s great to imagine yourself as a success and to believe that you will become a success.  I think it’s dangerous to believe that merely imagining the smile on your face when you succeed will be enough to ensure your success.

There are no two ways about it.  You have to do the work.  You have to study for the exam, anticipate the questions you will receive in a job interview, prepare diligently for a presentation.  If you do the work, it becomes easier to imagine yourself smiling when you get the positive result you desire.

One last thing — I am not dissing the power of a smile.  Smiles are good.  Smiles are powerful.  They brand you as a friendly, approachable person.  I advise all of my career mentoring clients to do their best to keep a smile on their faces.

So go ahead and smile.  Look at the sunny side.  But do the work you need to do — and you’ll succeed.

Your career mentor,

Bud

PS: I write this blog to help people create the life and career success they want and deserve.  Now I’m going one step further.  I’ve created a membership site in which I’ve pulled together my best thoughts on success.  And, as a reader of this blog, you can become a member for free.  Just go to  www.BudBilanich.com/join to claim your free membership. You’ll be joining a vibrant and growing community of success minded professionals.  I hope to see you there.

 

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Assume People Will Like You — and They Will http://www.budbilanich.com/assume-people-will-like-you-and-they-will/ http://www.budbilanich.com/assume-people-will-like-you-and-they-will/#respond Mon, 20 Apr 2015 13:13:36 +0000 http://www.budbilanich.com/?p=7666

First impressions are important.  They count whether you’re looking for a job, or have a job and are looking to climb the corporate ladder.  You will always be meeting new people.  And every new person you meet provides an opportunity to make a good first impression.

This article provides five tips for making a good first impression…

http://www.bakadesuyo.com/2015/04/first-impression/?utm_source=%22Barking+Up+The+Wrong+Tree%22+Weekly+Newsletter&utm_campaign=ef9e43d5dc-impression_04_19_2015&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_78d4c08a64-ef9e43d5dc-56573501

I’m not so sure that you want to buy a cheeseburger for every person you meet.  In fact, these days many people are disgusted by cheeseburgers (they’re vegetarian, or they live a healthy lifestyle).  And, I’m not so sure that two cheeseburgers have the pleasure equivalent of one orgasm.  On the other hand, offering to do something like buying a cup of coffee for a new acquaintance is a pretty good idea.  That’s it for my quibbles with this article.

I want to focus on the first piece of advice — assume that people you meet will like you.  The article calls this social optimism.  It works for me.  I am confident when I meet someone new because I assume they will like me, and I act that way.  I look people in the eye.  I give them a firm handshake.  I smile.  I ask about them and their interests.  When asked how I’m doing, I reply, “Great, how about you.”  I do all of these things because I am a social optimist who assumes new people will like me.

Social pessimists, on the other hand, have a hard time looking people in the eye.  They give limp handshakes, They hesitate to smile and ask others about their interests.  When asked how they’re doing, they say something like, “I’m OK.”  They assume that other people are judging them and that they will come up wanting.  They sabotage themselves by making a poor first impression.

The old saying, “If you’re an optimist, you’re right.  And if you’re a pessimist you’re also right.” is true.  By choosing the optimistic position — assuming people will like you — you are very likely to create a positive first impression.

Your career mentor,

Bud

PS: I write this blog to help people create the life and career success they want and deserve.  Now I’m going one step further.  I’ve created a membership site in which I’ve pulled together my best thoughts on success.  And, as a reader of this blog, you can become a member for free.  Just go to  www.BudBilanich.com/join to claim your free membership. You’ll be joining a vibrant and growing community of success minded professionals.  I hope to see you there.

 

 

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Skills You Need to Succeed in Today’s Competitive Workplace http://www.budbilanich.com/skills-you-need-to-succeed-in-todays-competitive-workplace/ http://www.budbilanich.com/skills-you-need-to-succeed-in-todays-competitive-workplace/#respond Fri, 17 Apr 2015 16:20:20 +0000 http://www.budbilanich.com/?p=7662

If you read this blog with any regularity you know that I have joined the faculty at the University of Denver’s Daniels College of Business.  I was in a faculty meeting the other day and we were discussing the outcomes of our MBA program.  Here is what we want our MBA students to be able to do when they leave us.

Ethical Decision Making — the ability and willingness to analyze and apply the legal and ethical implications of complex business decisions.

Technical Knowledge — knowledge of a specific technical area and the ability to apply that knowledge in their work.

Communication Skills — the ability to conduct effective conversations, write clearly, concisely and persuasively, and to influence others via presentations.

Leadership Effectiveness — the ability to lead individuals and groups to achieve organizational goals.

Critical Thinking — the ability to apply a disciplined process of evaluating information in order to make well thought out decisions and action plans.

Global and Intercultural Awareness — the ability to understand the global and cultural implications of complex business issues.

These are the six ideas we incorporate into all of our courses.

They are also important pillars of success that you should pay attention to in your career journey.

Your career mentor,

Bud

PS: I write this blog to help people create the life and career success they want and deserve.  Now I’m going one step further.  I’ve created a membership site in which I’ve pulled together my best thoughts on success.  And, as a reader of this blog, you can become a member for free.  Just go to  www.BudBilanich.com/join to claim your free membership. You’ll be joining a vibrant and growing community of success minded professionals.  I hope to see you there.

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You Don’t Want to Become Known as Someone Who Just Checks Off Career Boxes http://www.budbilanich.com/7658/ http://www.budbilanich.com/7658/#respond Fri, 17 Apr 2015 12:59:37 +0000 http://www.budbilanich.com/?p=7658

Many, many years ago I was working for a very large company (Fortune 25) in New York City. I had responsibility for managing the company’s summer intern program. We hired a couple hundred interns — mostly MBA students — every summer, many of whom ended up joining us once they finished their degree.

I remember one HR intern in particular. She was a young woman from somewhere in the upper Midwest who was quite dazzled by the bright lights and big city. She did a nice job as an intern and we offered her a full time position once she graduated. She was ambitious and made it clear to us that she wanted to climb the corporate ladder – and do it at the NYC headquarters.

Fast forward several years. I was running my consulting business. The Plant Manager at one of this company’s manufacturing sites in New Jersey asked me to help him develop his leaders. When I showed up at the site, I ran into this woman. She was living in Manhattan and doing a 75 mile round trip reverse commute to New Jersey every day.

I was kind of surprised to see her there. I knew that she thought of herself as a city girl. When I asked, “What are you doing here? I thought you wanted to work in the city.” She said, “I’ll only be here for about 18 months. This is just a ticket punching stop for me. I don’t really like what I’m doing but I think having some manufacturing experience will help me down the road.”

I thought about this woman the other day when I read an interview with Andy Bryant, the Chairman of Intel. He said something very interesting…

“People inside Intel often come to me for advice and they might say, ‘I’ve got these two job offers inside the company. I don’t know which one to take.’ I’ll say, ‘Which do you want to do?’ They’ll say, ‘I want this one, but the other one is the next step up.’

“And I’ll say: ‘The thing I learned is that if you’re not doing the job you want to do, it will reflect on your performance. You’re better off to take a job you’re excited about than to do the one you think somebody wants you to do.’ People are successful when they’re intellectually and emotionally engaged as opposed to when they’re just checking the box.”

The young woman I was describing earlier was checking the manufacturing box – punching her ticket to use her words. Her story didn’t have a happy ending. She failed pretty miserably at her ticket punching job. She never got intellectually and emotionally involved – and it showed. She spent only 12 months in that role, because the site leader and her boss, the Director of HR for the site couldn’t wait to get rid of her.

Instead of punching her ticket or checking off the box, she gained a reputation as someone who wasn’t committed to her work and the company.

The common sense advice here? Don’t see your career as a series of jobs in which you check off the appropriate boxes. Choose opportunities that will engage you – even if they are a lateral move, or a half step down. Do your best every day. Take care of the details. Brand yourself as someone who is committed to your company. Things will work out well in the end.

Your career mentor,

Bud

PS: I write this blog to help people create the life and career success they want and deserve.  Now I’m going one step further.  I’ve created a membership site in which I’ve pulled together my best thoughts on success.  And, as a reader of this blog, you can become a member for free.  Just go to  www.BudBilanich.com/join to claim your free membership. You’ll be joining a vibrant and growing community of success minded professionals.  I hope to see you there.

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You Can Write a LinkedIn Summary That Gets You Noticed by the Right People http://www.budbilanich.com/you-can-write-a-linkedin-summary-that-gets-you-noticed-by-the-right-people/ http://www.budbilanich.com/you-can-write-a-linkedin-summary-that-gets-you-noticed-by-the-right-people/#respond Thu, 16 Apr 2015 12:40:16 +0000 http://www.budbilanich.com/?p=7654

When it comes to business social networks LinkedIn rules.  When it comes to your LinkedIn profile, your summary rules.  This article provides some excellent common sense advice on how to write a LinkedIn summary that really rocks…

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/how-write-perfect-linkedin-summary-william-arruda

I like all of William’s V’s for creating the content for your summary.

I like his advice on testing your summary even more.

Take another look…

  1. Does the opening sentence, phrase or heading make you want to read more?
  2. Is it authentic – consistent with who you really are?
  3. Does it differentiate you from your peers or competitors?
  4. Is it relevant, addressing the needs of the people you are trying to attract (decision-makers and influencers)?
  5. Is it compelling? Does it provide interesting facts and statements that make the reader want to get to know you?
  6. Does it contain at least 20 – 30% personal information (your interests, passions, values, philanthropic interests, point of view and life experiences)?
  7. Does it explain how you add value, telling the reader what happens when you do what you do?
  8. Does the writing style and content you included convey your personality?
  9. Is it formatted beautifully? Did you create enough white space to break up the paragraphs? Did you write powerful headlines for different content blocks?
  10. Does it include external validation (things like “People say I’m…” or a favorite quote or “The Association of Finance Executives awarded me…”)?
  11. Is it grammatically correct and perfectly proofed?
  12. Does it include all the keywords for which you want to be known multiple times? (This is vital for being found in online searches.)
  13. Did you get the reader to want to learn more or take action?

William (he is a friend of mine) suggests that you score yourself on a 1 — 3 scale on these questions.  I’m more of a binary guy, so I suggest you answer a simple yes or no for each of these 13 questions.  Regardless, the important point here is to reread what you’ve written to see if communicates the you that you want other people to see.

My LinkedIn summary begins with this statement…

“I’ve been fortunate in my life and career.  My grandfather never went to school.  He went into the coal mines in Central PA when he was eight.  My dad worked in a steel mill for 37 years.  Because of their hard work, encouragement and example, I ended up with a Harvard PhD and have run a successful management consulting and executive coaching business for the past 25 years.”

I can honestly answer “yes” to William’s first question — “Does the opening sentence, phrase or heading make you want to read more?”  I’m sure I’m not alone, but I have not met any Harvard alums who had a grandfather who never went to school.  If I read this statement about someone else I’d want to read more.

You may agree or disagree with the previous point.  If you disagree, please leave a comment telling me why.  I am always open to feedback.  Who knows, I may end up changing my opening statement based on your feedback.

This is an important post.  It’s important because you need to be on LinkedIn.  You also need to have a dynamite summary that gets people interested in you.  Do yourself a favor.  Take a hard look at your LinkedIn summary and use William’s ideas to make some changes.  I’ll be making some changes to my summary based on William’s ideas.

Your career mentor,

Bud

PS: I write this blog to help people create the life and career success they want and deserve.  Now I’m going one step further.  I’ve created a membership site in which I’ve pulled together my best thoughts on success.  And, as a reader of this blog, you can become a member for free.  Just go to  www.BudBilanich.com/join to claim your free membership. You’ll be joining a vibrant and growing community of success minded professionals.  I hope to see you there.

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The 3 Biggest Mistakes You Are Making When You Do a Presentation http://www.budbilanich.com/the-3-biggest-mistakes-you-are-making-when-you-do-a-presentation/ http://www.budbilanich.com/the-3-biggest-mistakes-you-are-making-when-you-do-a-presentation/#respond Wed, 15 Apr 2015 13:23:17 +0000 http://www.budbilanich.com/?p=7649

The ability to deliver dynamic and convincing presentations is an important key to success.  Yet many of my career mentoring clients tell me that they are afraid of standing up in front of a group and speaking.

Arvee Robinson is a friend of mine.  She is a presentation skills expert. The other day, I received an email from her in which she outlined the three biggest mistakes many people make when they are asked to deliver a presentation.  Check them out…

  1. Starting your speech with a joke, quote, or story. You have 3 seconds to grab your audience’s attention and in those 3 seconds they have decided whether or not you are an expert and if they are going to listen. Starting with a joke, quote, story is risky because it takes your audience’s attention away from you and on to someone or somewhere else. There are better ways to grab their attention and keep it.
  2. Giving too much content. We’ve heard content is king. However, it’s valuable content that’s king. If you give too much in a short period of time, you cannot go deep enough to teach your audience and they will lose interest and zone out. It’s important to give the right amount of content for the right amount of time you have to speak.
  3. No call to action. Big mistake because this step is what generates the leads, referrals, clients, and prospects to your business. If you don’t invite people to take action, they won’t and you just flapped your jaw for nothing. Instead, take a moment at the end of your presentation to invite your audience to take the next step with you. That step may be to sign up for a coaching session, phone call, or a program. Whatever it is, the invitation is key.

Arvee usually works with speakers who are selling a service.  Her third point is directed at them.  However, a call to action is really important even if you aren’t in business for yourself.

For example, if you’re doing a talk to senior executives in your company, you most likely want them to approve and fund a project.  You need to end your talk with a call to action that clearly states what you are asking for.  If you’re looking for volunteers for your child’s school trip, you need to end your talk with a call to action that encourages other parents to get involved.  If you’re leading a training program in your company, you need to end with a call to action that encourages people to use the skills they’ve learned.

If you avoid the three problems Arvee lays out, you’ll do a better job of delivering dynamic presentations that help you get what you want.

Your career mentor,

Bud

PS: I write this blog to help people create the life and career success they want and deserve.  Now I’m going one step further.  I’ve created a membership site in which I’ve pulled together my best thoughts on success.  And, as a reader of this blog, you can become a member for free.  Just go to  www.BudBilanich.com/join to claim your free membership. You’ll be joining a vibrant and growing community of success minded professionals.  I hope to see you there.

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